Beyond the Books

Home » Articles posted by thedarkphantom (Page 2)

Author Archives: thedarkphantom

Character Interview: Karen Wilkes from James D. Bell’s legal thriller, ‘Maximilian’s Treasure’

character interviews logoWe’re thrilled to have here today Karen Wilkes from James D. Bell’s new legal thriller, Maximilian’s Treasure.  Karen is a 26-year-old paralegal living in Jackson, Mississippi.

It is a pleasure to have her with us today at Beyond the Books!

Thank you so for this interview, Karen.  Now that the book has been written, do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight with your readers?

Karen:  Judge Bell is not going to read this, is he?  I don’t want him to think that I believe he fell short in his description of me.  He really did about as good a job as a man can do describing what I was thinking and feeling.  But any woman can tell you a man has no idea what we are really thinking!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Maximilian’s Treasure is such an emotional rollercoaster, so many highs and lows.  Just imagine what you would be thinking when you know deep in your heart that you have found the perfect man, and you hear him fawning over another woman.

Excuse me.  I still get emotional just thinking about it.

I know John and I were never an item, but I thought it was just a matter of time before he would discover the truth that he couldn’t live without me.  After all we are not just a good team; we are the best.  He didn’t win all those cases by himself you know.  I just couldn’t believe he would be so foolish as to fall for some blond bombshell reporter. How could he be so shallow?  I decided to leave before I said something I would regret.  I moved to another city, hoping he would never find me.  I can’t wait to tell you what happened next. …

Do you feel the author did a good job colorizing your personality?  If not, how would you like to have been portrayed differently?

Karen:  I’m a strong, smart, fiercely loyal woman with a passionate desire to help others.  That’s why I became a paralegal.  I really feel for the people who seek our help.  They bring us their biggest problems and they count on us to find solutions.  Nothing compares to the feeling I get when I know we’ve truly helped someone.

What do you believe is your strongest trait?

Karen:  I’m loyal to a fault and I’ve learned to trust my instincts.  For instance, that new guy in the office, Peter; I felt there was something odd about him.  I didn’t trust him.  When you read the book, let me know if you think I was right about him.

Worse trait?

Karen:  Like I said, I’m loyal to a fault.  That, along with my passion to help people, gets me in trouble.  My heart is in everything I do.  That helps me do my best, but it exposes my heart to being broken, do you know what I mean?  Oh, and I do have a temper.  My dad always blamed it on my red hair.  I blame it on John!  He is too blind to see true love!

If you could choose someone in the television or movie industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be (and you can’t say yourself!)?

Karen:  I’m thinking Rachel Bilson, or Emma Stone, or maybe Rachel Brosnahan.  It’s got to be someone smart with a strong personality, and she must be drop-dead beautiful, of course.

Do you have a love interest in the book?

Karen:  Well, I don’t want to say too much, but let me tell you about B.H. Sutton!  That’s a real man.  He is smart, loyal, good-looking, strong, and he knows a good thing when he sees it.

At what point of the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

Karen:  You probably would think I would say when we were run off the road, or when the deputy arrested us, or when John’s houseboat blew up.  But the time I was most nervous was at the wedding.  B.H. and I were holding hands and looking into each other’s eyes when John burst into the room.  That took the cake.

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

Karen:  I can tell you it wouldn’t be Sandy.  I thought we were friends, but not after the way she went after John.  I would trade places with Natalia.  She is smart, brave, dangerously beautiful and lives a life of adventure, traveling around the world with a mysterious secret agenda.   She casts a spell over men with her exotic looks.  When the need arises, she is ready to step up and be a leader.  I could do that!

How do you feel about the ending of the book without giving too much away?

Karen:  I haven’t caught my breath yet.  So much happens so fast.  Everything is so interconnected.  It’s proof that we don’t live in some protected little bubble surrounding our own little world.  What happens far away matters here and what happened long ago matters now.  Everything you do has impact, for good or for bad, further and longer than you can imagine.

What words of wisdom would you give your author if he decided to write another book with you in it?

Karen:  Each of Judge Bell’s stories has a purpose, a moral to the story.  I hope he continues to write with purpose.  And he should emphasis me in his next book!

Thank you for this interview, Karen.  Will we be seeing more of you in the future?

Karen:  Of course!  Everyone knows that the paralegal is the essential character in any law novel or law office.  Frankly, if Judge Bell doesn’t give me a leading role in his next book, I may write my own.  By the way, here’s some inside information.  Be on the lookout for the next novel, Whom Shall I Send?  It’s a romantic adventure.  I bet you can’t guess who he’s sending.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

James D. Bell is an award-winning author and retired Judge who received the highest bar association approval ratings ever given to a Mississippi Circuit or County Judge. He is listed in Preeminent Lawyers, Outstanding Lawyers of America and Top 100 Attorneys of North America.  He is the author of two novels, Vampire Defense and Maximilian’s Treasure.  His short story, The Adventures of Sherlock Hound, was published in Dog Stories for the Soul, alongside stories from Mark Twain, John Steinbeck, Willie Morris and others.  The son of a Choctaw mother and a Mississippi businessman, Judge Bell is devoted to his wife, Joanne.  They live in Brandon, Mississippi and have four children.  Judge Bell practices law in Jackson, Mississippi, but is frequently called back to the bench by the Mississippi Supreme Court for short term assignments. Visit the author’s website at www.judgebell.com.

The Story behind ‘Fortunate Son: the Story of Baby Boy Francis’ by Brooks Eason

The Story Behind the Book

Sometimes a person knows he wants to be an author but has a hard time deciding what to write. Sometimes it’s just the opposite, and a person who has no intention of becoming an author learns a story he feels compelled to write. In my case I was already an author and then  a story came along that I felt compelled to write. I had written one book, Travels with Bobby – Hiking in the Mountains of the American West. I knew I wanted to write another one, and an amazing true story that demanded to be written fell into my lap.
I was adopted as an infant, had wonderful parents, never searched for my birth mother, and never would have. But fifteen years ago I learned that Julie Francis was my birth mother as a result of litigation that lawyers pursued in four courts in two states in…

View original post 887 more words

Character Interview: Josie Kendal from Michael Bowen’s political thriller ‘False Flag in Autumn’

character interviewWe’re thrilled to have you her today, Josie, from Michael Bowen’s new political thriller, False Flag in Autumn.  Josie is a twenty-eight year old political communications specialist living in Washington, D.C.

It’s a pleasure to have her with us today at Beyond the Books!

Thank you so for this interview, Josie.  Now that the book has been written, do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight without your readers?

I think Bowen pretty much nailed me.  I’m not a saint.  When I die the topic of canonization will not come up.  But I’ve only done one thing that I’m truly ashamed of, and he let me show my remorse for that.  I didn’t realize that I used naughty words as freely as I apparently do, but I have to admit, when I saw them there on the page they sounded like me.  It’s kind of a lazy habit that I fell into almost casually when I started working in Washington.  Bowen seems to think False Flag in Autumn is a redemption story, but to tell you the truth I’m not sure I need redemption all that much.  A lot of politics is like a spikes-high slide into second base:  it ain’t pretty – but that’s the way the game is played.  You can play the game that way, or you can sit on the sideline polishing your halo.  I want to be in the game.

False Flag in Autumn.jpgDo you feel the author did a good job of colorizing your personality?  If not, how would you like to have been portrayed differently?

Well, I do like cocktails (especially when my husband, Rafe, makes them), and even though I’ve been (mostly) smoke-free for three years now, sometimes it’s a struggle to hang onto the “mostly.”  I like having to think fast and I like getting it right when I do.  And I do desperately love Rafe, and cherish both our intellectual sympatico and our sexual intimacy.  Bowen is right about all that stuff.  Bowen seems a little judgmental about me at times – I’m sure I picked up a subtly disapproving tone when he had me refer to “casual hook-ups that I got over when I was 20”.  I guess that’s because deep down he’s as crazy about me as Rafe is – and who could blame him for that?

What do you believe is your strongest trait?

Self-awareness.  I’m spunky but I’m not particularly brave, and I know it.  My mind is fast but it’s not deep, and I know that, too.  I’m pretty smart, but I’m not wise, at least not yet.  All I have to do to excite male sexual desire is breathe, and I’ve been known to use that gift teasingly. 

Worst trait?

I sometimes fall into the trap of kidding myself.  I spend all day spinning politicians and reporters, and sometimes when I look back on something that didn’t go well, I realize that I was spinning myself without realizing it (until it was too late).

If you could choose someone in the movie or television industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be (and you can’t say yourself!)?

Nicole Kidman.  With a glossy black wig and a little Creole make-up, she could play me perfectly, and even flashback to my student days at Tulane and my early internships in Washington if she had to. 

Do you have a love interest in the book?

Absolutely:  my husband, Rafe.  Charm, good looks, brains, guts – he’s more than twenty years older than I am, but he’s the whole package.  Rafe’s first wife died while she was pregnant with what would have been their first child, and I think that tragedy really deepened him.  When I first started working full-time in D.C., I treated the available males as a buffet.  Then, when I met Rafe, I realized that I’d been playing triple-A ball.  Rafe was my introduction to the major leagues.

At what point in the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

When a White House aide showed me two personnel files with CI (“Congressional Influence”) stamped on them, and then winked at me.  I knew he wanted to use me as an unwitting pawn in a scheme that had “special prosecutor” written all over it, and I had no idea what the scheme was.  I knew right then I should just walk away – but I’m hard-wired not to walk away from heavy duty political action.

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

Hank Sinclair, the White House aide.  He’s so breathtakingly handsome that he’s always had his way with women, and that has led him into some very bad habits.  Much, much worse, he’s book-smart but not gut-smart.  That’s a bad combination almost anywhere, but in Washington it can be fatal – literally fatal.

How do you feel about the ending of the book without giving too much away?

Bittersweet.  I found out something important about myself that maybe I’d rather have not known.  I guess it’s good to know, but there are times when I miss the illusion.

What words of wisdom would you give your author if he decided to write another book with you in it?

Maybe treat my occasional introspection the way you treat sex between me and Rafe:  just a hint here and there, and leave the rest to the readers’ imaginations.  Readers are smart.  They won’t have any trouble connecting the dots.

Thank you for this interview, Josie.  Will we be seeing more of you in the future?

Let’s see what happens between now and November, 2020.  Depending on how things turn out, Bowen may be working with characters who sip sherry with the village vicar by then.

high_mbowen 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michael Bowen is a retired trial lawyer and graduate of Harvard Law School who has published nineteen mysteries, ranging from Washington crime stories to plucky couple puzzle mysteries (and sometimes  both at the same time).  www.michaelbowenmysteries.com.

About your book and purchase link:   False Flag in Autumn is available as both an ebook and in hard cover from amazon.  Fine bookstores can also order it through Ingram – and who knows, maybe some of them already have.

Character Interview: Enid Carmichael from Susan McCormick’s new cozy murder mystery, The Fog Ladies

We are thrilled to have here today Enid Carmichael from Susan McCormick’s new cozy murder mystery The Fog Ladies. Mrs. Carmichael is an 80-year-old busy body with good hearing living in an elegant apartment building in San Francisco where old ladies start to die.

It’s a pleasure to have Mrs. Carmichael with us today at Beyond the Books!

Thank you so much for this interview, Mrs. Carmichael. Now that the book has been written do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight with your readers?

Hmph. Well. I was certainly well portrayed in the chapters I wrote myself, the chapters in my own words. But I was sorely disappointed to read what some of my so-called friends had to say. I’m more than a little miffed, for instance, to learn that Harriet Flynn thinks I’m a lush. I’m not a lush. I have sherry with my tea. But that’s common place. She just has an attitude about alcohol. That’s what her problem is.

Do you feel the author did a good job colorizing your personality? If not, how would you have liked to have been portrayed differently?

There is far too much emphasis on my apartment’s perch over the street. My window does let me see what goes on, but that’s not a bad thing. Someone has to watch the comings and goings of the building, especially with what’s been happening. We don’t want to all end up dead.

What do you believe is your strongest trait?

Well, I believe it is accurately mentioned in the book that I have good hearing. My hearing is sharp, much sharper than people give me credit for, because I am eighty. There are benefits to getting old. I overhear a lot of things people don’t intend.

Worse trait?

Hmph. You probably want me to say that knowing everyone’s business is my worst trait. Well maybe it is. But who’s alive and who’s dead? Hmm? Hmm?

If you could choose someone in the television or movie industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be?

Julia Child. But I outlived her didn’t I? Darn. We look alike. We are both tall and my hair used to be brown. Before it was red. Plus, I love her spark. And I believe she liked sherry, or at least she had it on hand for cooking.

Do you have a love interest in the book?

Me. No. I’m eighty. But I suppose that didn’t stop Alma Gordon. Who saw that coming? Not me. See, I don’t know everything. I’m not a snoop.

At what point of the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

You mean the part where I was on life support?

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

Well, that’s easy. Muriel Bridge. She’s dead. Head cracked open. Fell off a stool cleaning bugs out of her kitchen light. But I don’t believe that for an instant. She was pushed.

How do you feel about the end of the book without giving too much away?

I am very pleased that I am here to give you this interview. But, so as not to give too much away, I will add that I might be speaking to you from beyond the grave. I believe in ghosts, you know.

What words of wisdom would you give your author if she decided to write another book with you in it?

Left less emphasis on my height. What’s all this “big woman” stuff?

Thank you for this interview, Enid Carmichael. Will we be seeing more of you in the future?

Hmph. Of course, I’m a Fog Lady, aren’t I?

/////////////////////////////////////////////

TheFogLadies_w13428_cover

The Fog Ladies is a cozy murder mystery set in an elegant apartment building in San Francisco where old ladies start to die. Mrs. Bridge falls off a stool cleaning bugs out of her kitchen light. Mrs. Talwin slips on bubbles in the bath and drowns. The Pacific Heights building is turning over tenants faster than the fog rolls in a cool San Francisco evening.

Young, overworked, overtired, overstressed medical intern Sarah James has no time for sleuthing. Her elderly neighbors, the Fog Ladies, have nothing but time. Sarah assumes the deaths are the natural consequence of growing old. The Fog Ladies assume murder.

Sarah resists the Fog Ladies’ perseverations. But when one of them falls down the stairs and tells Sarah she was pushed, even Sarah believes evil lurks in their building. Can they find the killer before they fall victim themselves?

Author Photo

About the Author

Susan McCormick writes cozy murder mysteries. She is also the author of Granny Can’t Remember Me, a lighthearted picture book about Alzheimer’s disease. She is a doctor who lives in Seattle. She graduated from Smith College and George Washington University School of Medicine, with additional medical training in Washington, DC and San Francisco, where she lived in an elegant apartment building much like the one in the book. She served nine years in the military before settling in the Pacific Northwest. She is married and has two boys, plus a giant Newfoundland dog.

Website:

https://susanmccormickbooks.com

Goodreads / Bookbub

Find out more about THE FOG LADIES:

Amazon / B&N

Social media:

https://www.facebook.com/susanmccormickauthor/

https://twitter.com/smccormickbooks

https://www.instagram.com/susanmccormickbooks/

 

Character Interview: Peggy Nahoe from Rosemary and Larry Mild’s ‘Copper and Goldie, 13 Tails of mystery and Suspense in Hawai‘i’

character interviewWe’re thrilled to have here today Peggy Nahoe from Rosemary and Larry Mild’s mystery short story collection: Copper and Goldie, 13 Tails of Mystery and Suspense in Hawai‘i. Peggy Nahoe (pronounced Na-ho-ay) is a thirteen-year-old schoolgirl living in Honolulu. It is a pleasure to have Peggy with us today at Beyond the Books! Thank you so for this interview, Peggy.

Now that the book has been published, do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight with your readers?

Cover ARtPEGGY: The Milds live in Honolulu, they’re like locals. They nailed me pretty well and what I’m up to most of the time. The many stories I’m in start when I’m only nine, and they usually take place on Sundays when my daddy, Kamuela—that’s Sam in Hawaiian—has visitation rights. Sigh! He and my mom, Kianah, are split and I get bounced back and forth like some old volleyball. They fought all the time on account of him getting distraught after being medically pensioned from the Honolulu Police Department. You see, he’s got a bullet in his spine and needs Cane and Able, his two canes, to walk. Daddy drives a cab now and was very lonely until I suggested that he get a pet. He chose a golden retriever named Goldie, and I’m glad he did. Goldie’s smart and rides in the shotgun seat of his cab while they drive all around the island of Oahu picking up fares. I shudder to think how many bad guys and gals they’ve encountered. I only hope they know how to handle them.

Do you feel the author did a good job colorizing your personality?

PEGGY: Oh sure. They let me speak the king’s English with only a skosh Hawaiian or pidgin tossed in like a jalapeno for flavor. Not like some of the other characters. My daddy’s taught me to be proud of my Hawaiian heritage. I turned out to be a really sensitive and caring person. Mom says I argue with her too much. Rosemary and Larry made me tall for my age, athletic, with sun-dark island looks, and long dark hair that just won’t behave. It seems like I’m always washing or brushing it. I just wish my authors wouldn’t put me in harm’s way so much.

What do you believe is your strongest trait?

PEGGY: That’s a tough one. I think maybe it’s somewhere between cleverness and loyalty. I’ve gotten myself out of some pretty tight jams—like the time the kidnappers held me captive in the barn. As for loyalty, I could never choose between Mom or Daddy when they’re fighting. I suppose there’s a lot of kindness in me too—like I’m always feeling sorry for the bad guys and gals after they’re caught. I have to ask Daddy what’s going to happen to them.

Worse trait?

PEGGY: Anger that I sometimes can’t suppress. Those strange pictures that turn up in my camera, a birthday gift from my daddy. I even hid in my room when he came over to apologize. I wouldn’t speak to him. Also, my friends sometimes say I’m too bossy.

If you could choose someone in the television or movie industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be (and you can’t say yourself!)?

PEGGY: If I left it to the Milds they’d say Margaret O’Brien, but I don’t even know who that is. But I saw an old rerun of Hawaii Five-O with Londyn Silzer, a kid actress, the other night and she looks a little bit like me. She even talks like me.

Do you have a love interest in the book?

PEGGY: No. Unfortunately, I’m kinda young for that stuff. I might have had a crush on the red-headed haole boy in geography class, but don’t you go telling Mom now. Honest, my big love is for my dog, Goldie.

At what point of the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

PEGGY: I never let myself cry, but I start to wonder whether I’ll ever have my family together again. I know they still love each, but they haven’t found out yet. Ohana—that means family in Hawaiian, and ohana is the most important thing in my life.

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

PEGGY: I wouldn’t want to be Carly Adams. She didn’t want to hurt anyone, but she stole a whole lot of money and now she’s going to jail.

How do you feel about the ending of the book without giving too much away?

PEGGY: I’m itching to tell you the endings to all my stories, but the Milds won’t let me—especially when the bank robbers kidnapped me. Rosemary threatened to take away my loco moco if I do. That’s two sunny-side-up eggs on top of a huge hamburger amid a whole plateful of sticky white rice, all immersed in dark brown gravy. Yum!

What words of wisdom would you give your authors if they decided to write another book with you in it?

PEGGY: They don’t need any words of wisdom—they’re a real cool couple, and if and when they publish a sequel, I want to be all grown up in my thirties, and married with a baby, and be the boss of my own detective business just like Daddy. Then again, I could be a lawyer just like Mom. I can’t decide.

Thank you for this interview, Peggy.

PEGGY: And mahalo (thank you) to you too for having me.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS 

mild5ROSEMARY AND LARRY MILD, cheerful partners in crime, coauthor mystery, suspense, and fantasy fiction. Their popular Hawaii novels, Cry Ohana and its sequel Honolulu Heat, vibrate with island color, local customs, and exquisite scenery. Also by the Milds: The Paco and Molly Murder Mysteries: Locks and Cream Cheese, Hot Grudge Sunday, and Boston Scream Pie. And the Dan and Rivka Sherman Mysteries: Death Goes Postal, Death Takes A Mistress, and Death Steals A Holy Book. Plus Unto the Third Generation, A Novella of the Future, and three collections of wickedly entertaining mystery stories—Murder, Fantasy, and Weird Tales; The Misadventures of Slim O. Wittz, Soft-Boiled Detective; and Copper and Goldie, 13 Tails of Mystery and Suspense in Hawai‘i. 

ROSEMARY, a graduate of Smith College and former assistant editor of Harper’s, also delves into her own nonfiction life. She published two memoirs: Love! Laugh! Panic! Life With My Mother and the acclaimed Miriam’s World—and Mine, for the beloved daughter they lost in the terrorist bombing of Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. On her lighter side, Rosemary also writes award-winning humorous essays, such as failing the test to get on Jeopardy; and working for a giant free-spending corporation on a sudden budget: “No new pencil unless you turn in the old stub.”

LARRY, who was only called Lawrence when he’d done something wrong, graduated from American University in Information Systems Management. In 2019 he published his autobiography, No Place To Be But Here: My Life and Times, which traces his thirty-eight-year professional engineering career from its beginning as an electronics technician in the U.S. Navy, to a field engineer riding Navy ships, to a digital systems/instrument designer for major Government contractors in the signal analysis field, to where he rose to the most senior level of principal engineer when he retired in 1993.

Making use of his past creativity and problem-solving abilities, Larry naturally drifted into the realm of mystery writing, where he also claims to be more devious than his partner in crime and best love, Rosemary. So he conjures up their plots and writes the first drafts, leaving Rosemary to breathe life into their characters and sizzle into their scenes. A perfect marriage of their talents.

THE MILDS are active members of Sisters in Crime where Larry is a Mister in Crime; Mystery Writers of America; and Hawaii Fiction Writers. In 2013 they waved goodbye to Severna Park, Maryland and moved to Honolulu, Hawaii, where they cherish quality time with their daughters and grandchildren. When Honolulu hosted Left Coast Crime in 2017, Rosemary and Larry were the program co-chairs for “Honolulu Havoc.”

Over a dozen worldwide trips to Japan, China, Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma, Great Britain, France, Italy, Israel, Egypt, and more have wormed their way into their amazing stories. In their limited spare time, they are active members of the Honolulu Jewish Film Festival committee, where Larry is the statistician and recordkeeper for their film ratings.

 Website: https://www.magicile.com

Review: From Idea to Reality: An Entrepreneur’s Guide to Meaningful Business Growth, by Jean Paulynice

From-idea-to-reality-FRONT-CoverTitle: From Idea to Reality: An Entrepreneur’s Guide to Meaningful Business Growth

Author: Jean Paul Paulynice, MBA

Publisher: PAULYNICE CONSULTING GROUP, LLC

Publisher’s contact info: INFO@PAULYNICECONSULTING.COM

Website: https://www.jeanpaulpaulynice.com/

Genre: Self-help/Inspirational

Publication Date: June 2019

ISBN: 978-1-7330427-1-0   (Hardback)    $19.99

ISBN: 978-1-7330427-2-7   (Paperback)  $14.99

ISBN: 978-1-7330427-7-2   (eBook)         $7.99

Find out more on Amazon.

Jean Paulynice draws from personal experience, revealing the secrets he shares with clients and provides you with essential information as if he were your own personal coach guiding you along the way.

By using this workbook, which has ample space for notes, you’ll be able to brainstorm, self reflect, and develop a plan/strategy, as well as become aware of not only your strengths but also your weaknesses and obstacles. In addition, you’ll be able to join a community of like-minded entrepreneurs.

Written in an engaging, conversational style, “From Idea to Reality” will help push you forward and gather momentum, improving your chances of discovering and fulfilling your true potential and increasing your chance of success. No matter your type of entrepreneurship, this book will be helpful if you’re starting out or would like to take your business to the next level.

 

 

Review: It’s Time to Start Living with Passion! My Journey to Self Discovery, by Jean Paul Paulynice

START-LIVING

Title: It’s Time to Start Living with Passion! My Journey to Self Discovery

Author: Jean Paul Paulynice, MBA

Publisher: PAULYNICE CONSULTING GROUP, LLC

Publisher’s contact info: INFO@PAULYNICECONSULTING.COM

Website: https://www.jeanpaulpaulynice.com/

Non-Fiction

Genre: Self-help/Inspirational

Publication Date: May 30, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-7330427-9-6 (Hardback)      $16.99

ISBN: 978-1-7335601-9-1 (Paperback)    $9.99

ISBN: 978-1-7330427-0-3 (eBook)           $3.99

ISBN: 978-1-7335601-2-2 (Audiobook)   $3.95

 

Do you feel as though you’re on autopilot, going through the motions every day—wake up, go to work, come back home, have dinner, sleep, repeat—without real meaning, depth, and purpose in your life?

 

Even if you have a fulfilling job and earn a good salary, that doesn’t mean you’ve found your passion in life. The problem is, finding your passion can be elusive, especially in our present society where we are constantly seeking external validation from others and are being judged in public platforms more than ever (i.e. social media). Perhaps the wisest statement in this book is that “the moment you start to listen to yourself, you can start shutting out all the noise.” This little book is all about soul-searching, self-analysis, and reflection. Sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone and seek out your passions. Sometimes you have to change your mindset and shift your perspective about things in order for transformation and growth to take place. Likewise, it’s also about the choices you make, not so much the major ones but the little ones you make on a daily basis.

 

In his light, honest, and engaging prose, Jean Paul Paulynice encourages you to do some introspection so you can begin your path toward finding your passion and bliss in life. For those who journal, the reflection questions he asks make very good journaling prompts. A very quick read, under fifty pages, It’s Time to Start Living with Passion! is a little morsel of goodness and wisdom that will help on your journey to self-discovery.

 

 

 

 

Character Interview: Darrell Henshaw from Randy Overbeck’s mystery/ghost novel ‘Blood on the Chesapeake’

character interviews logo We’re thrilled to have here today Darrell Henshaw from Randy Overbeck’s new ghost story/mystery, Blood on the Chesapeake.  Darrell is a 25-year-old high school teacher and coach originally from the Midwest, but currently living in Oxford, Maryland.

It is a pleasure to have Darrell with us today at Beyond the Books!

Thank you so for this interview, Darrell.  Now that the book has been written, do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight with your readers?

Overall, the answer is yes. Dr. Overbeck seemed to capture me fairly well, though Dr. Overbeck could have gone with a little less about my OCD. I mean everyone has quirks, right? But that doesn’t mean, you have to expose them. Also, my life is more than ghost hunting, though I get it, that was what the story was about. I’m pleased Overbeck did a solid job of portraying my work with students, which is important to me. After all, I’m dedicating my life to serving them. Oh, and I really liked his description of my girl, Erin Caveny. He hit it out of the park with her.

Do you feel the author did a good job colorizing your personality?  If not, how would you like to have been portrayed differently? Pretty much, I would answer yes. You notice, in the book, he didn’t describe me as one thing. I mean, after all, I’m a high school teacher and coach, though still a bit of a nerd. I’m also a ghost whisperer (I think I read one reviewer described me that way and I like the sound of it), even though that only gets me in trouble. I’m looking to mend a broken heart and fall in love with Erin. And, oh yeah, injustice really bothers me. I think Overbeck was able to capture these several facets of my life—okay, along with my OCD issues.

What do you believe is your strongest trait?

Readers might think it was my ghost hunting ability. I mean, how many people can see ghosts, much less have them communicate with you? But I think my best trait is that I care about the kids I serve, as a teacher and coach and beyond. As the story unfolded and I discovered what had happened to that poor student, Hank, my heart went out to him—even if he was already dead. Of course, I was out of my depth, but I felt compelled to do something to bring about justice for him and see that the people who had murdered him were punished.

Worse trait?

Without a doubt, my OCD. It’s always there but seems to flares up when I get nervous or overwhelmed. Sometimes—though I don’t admit this to many people—it can be so extreme that I’m paralyzed, sure that anything I do will lead to catastrophe. Early on, it got in the way of my dating Erin and, if I’m not careful, it can even leak into my work as a teacher and coach. I work on it all the time, and I’m proud of the progress I’ve made so far.

If you could choose someone in the television or movie industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be (and you can’t say yourself!)?

I don’t really like this question because it’s always hard to decide who could play me. I mean, will he get my OCD right and not go over the top with it? Can he convey my love of teaching and concern for the students correctly? With all that said, I think perhaps Logan Lehman or Nicolas Hoult could do me justice. Maybe, I can get Darrell to have the director hire me as a consultant.

Do you have a love interest in the book?

Most certainly, though I didn’t expect to. Before I came to Oxford for the new job, I had been dumped at the altar, kinda. (You’ll have to read the book for the details.) Anyway, I’d sworn off women, but then I met Erin and this stunning redhead with emerald eyes knocked my socks off. Not only is she beautiful, but she’s smart as a whip and brave. It’s a good thing too, because I needed her by my side as I worked my way through the mystery. I don’t think I would have made it without her. Scratch that, I definitely would not have made it without her.

At what point of the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

That’s easy. When I was friggin’ dumped overboard in rough seas in the middle of Chesapeake Bay and thought for sure I was going to drown, I definitely thought it was all over. Then…well, the readers will just have to see for themselves.

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

Of course, that would have to be one of the antagonists, or in plain speak, the villains. Probably I’d least like to switch places with Williams. He represents most of what I can’t stand—privileged, moneyed (well, I could tolerate the money) and arrogant individual who believes he is superior to others around him. A person who believes his money and position even allows him to use those around him. I’d be incredibly uncomfortable inside his skin.

How do you feel about the ending of the book without giving too much away?

I couldn’t have written it better myself. The bad guys get what they deserve and I get the girl. Oh, wait, that’s a spoiler, isn’t it? Can you delete that?

What words of wisdom would you give your author if s/he decided to write another book with you in it?

I already know Dr. Overbeck is planning more adventures for me—he’s talked with me about them—so here goes. Give me a chance to enjoy teaching and coaching the kids I like to work with. Don’t overdo the OCD; I’m not some kind of geek. And if you have to include another ghost, could you make it a beautiful girl, instead of a huge, scary guy? I’m just saying.

Thank you for this interview, Darrell.  Will we be seeing more of you in the future?

I’ve learned from Dr. Overbeck that he plans to include me in at least two more novels in the series he’s calling The Haunted Shores Series. (At least, I get to travel to these great resorts on the water.) For this next one, Overbeck has me headed to Cape May, New Jersey—which happens to be the most haunted town on the Eastern seaboard. Yikes. Then, there’s some talk about a trip for Erin and me to the Caribbean. I like the sound of that. After then that, well after that, he says it depends on what the readers want.

headshot

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Dr. Randy Overbeck is a veteran educator who has served children for more than three decades as a teacher and school leader. Over that time, he has worked many of the roles depicted in his writing, with responsibilities ranging from coach and yearbook advisor to principal and superintendent. An accomplished writer, he has been published in trade journals, professional texts and newspapers. His first novel, Leave No Child Behind, won the 2011 Silver Award for Thriller of the Year from ReadersFavorite.com. His new novel, Blood on the Chesapeake, is the first in the new Haunted Shores Mysteries series. Dr. Overbeck is a member of the Mystery Writers of America and an active member of the literary community. You can follow him on Twitter @OverbeckRandy, friend him on Facebook at Author Randy Overbeck or check out his webpage, www.authorrandyoverbeck.com.

BloodontheChesapeake_w12700_750

ABOUT THE BOOK

After being dumped by his fiancé, Darrell Henshaw, a young teacher and coach, strikes out for new pastures and lands a job on the Chesapeake Bay. He can’t believe his good fortune as Wilshire, a quiet, scenic and charming resort town on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay offers him his dream job—teaching high school history and coaching football and basketball—and, as it turns out, a second chance at love. Except no one told him that a student was murdered at the school and that the kid’s ghost haunts the hallways.

You see, Darrell sees ghosts, though he’s not happy about it. His first encounter with the spirit world did not go well and he has the OCD scars to prove it. But, after he’s hounded by the terrifying ghost, he decides to look into the murder, aided by his new love, Erin Caveny. Together, they follow a trail that leads back to the civil rights movement, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and even the Klu Klux Klan. Then, after two locals who try to help are murdered and Erin’s life is threatened, Darrell is forced to decide if he’s willing to risk his life—and the life of the woman he loves—to expose the killers of a young man he never knew. Find out more at: https://www.authorrandyoverbeck.com/books

 

Character Interview: Petra Simmons from Victoria Landis’ thriller, JORDAN

character interviews logoWe’re thrilled to have here today Petra Simmons from Victoria Landis’ new thriller, JORDAN.  Petra is a twenty-nine-year-old chocolate shop owner living in West Boca Raton, Florida.

It is a pleasure to have her with us today at Beyond the Books!

Thank you so for this interview, Petra.  Now that the book has been written, do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight with your readers?

I was, though some of the early readers did remark that I was a bit too protective of my little brother, Andy. Come to think of it, Jordan told me the same thing. I’m not sure I agree with any of them.

Do you feel the author did a good job colorizing your personality?  If not, how would you like to have been portrayed differently?

At times, I came off as being too jaded. I really do care about people, and I want them all to be healed, but I keep asking the questionwhy was it my life that had to get interrupted like that? Jordan said someday I’d have that answer, but it’s still bugging me.

I can compartmentalize. When hard things happen, I can push them to the back of my brain and concentrate on what needs to be done. I’m a survivor.

Worse trait?

I’m impatient, and I lose my temper with people I need to help me. It makes my life harder.

If you could choose someone in the television or movie industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be (and you can’t say yourself!)?

Hmmm . . . Alicia Vikander would be perfect. But she’d have to do an American accent.

Do you have a love interest in the book?

I do. My boyfriend, Ben Nathan. He’s a Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Deputy. Looks pretty hot in the uniform, too. I could see Liam Hemsworth playing him.

At what point of the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

Oh. Wow. Pretty early on. Which was why I was so hesitant to join Jordan in her ‘mission.’ Mission. I guess that’s what we should call it. I don’t know. But she convinced me. Convinced all of us.

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

Not want to be? Easy. Jordan. I mean, all of us want to have special abilitieswe think. But I saw up close what that means. You’ll never have a normal life. And I really, really, liked my normal life.

How do you feel about the ending of the book without giving too much away?

Huh. Well, it ended with a hopeful situation, but Landis sure did make us pay a price for it.

What words of wisdom would you give your author if s/he decided to write another book with you in it?

Not sure she’d listenand she’s already told me I’m in Book 2but I’d tell her to allow us to go to the bathroom. (Laughs)

Thank you for this interview, Petra.  Will we be seeing more of you in the future?

There are three books planned for this series, and yes, I’m supposed to be in all of them!

VickiSF15Headshot.jpeg

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

www.VictoriaLandis.com  Victoria Landis is a professional writer, editor, and artist. A 16-year member, and former board member, of Mystery Writers of America, she Co-Chaired the SleuthFest Writers Conference from 2015-2018.

She’s taught at SleuthFest, the Authors Academy at Murder on the Beach, and the Alvin Sherman Library at Nova Southeastern.

JordanFrontCoverFeb12019.jpg

ABOUT THE BOOK

When Petra Simmons and her brother, Andy, help a seemingly homeless young woman, it immediately changes their lives forever. Within days, it’s clear the woman, Jordan Crissman, possesses an amazing ability—perhaps the most miraculous ability of all.

They realize in the current world of viral social media, they must be careful.  How best to employ the miracle without causing havoc? They plot a strategy.

Despite their plans, word gets out too fast, and the world comes running—invading and overwhelming South Florida—along with serious danger.

Find out more on Amazon

 

Character Interview: Dr. Jane Beekman from Dwaine Rieves’ literary novel ‘Shirtless Men Drink Free’

character interviewWe’re thrilled to have here today Jane Beekman from Dwaine Rieves’ new literary fiction work titled, Shirtless Men Drink Free.  Jane is a 49-year-old pathologist and business entrepreneur living in Atlanta, Georgia.

It is a pleasure to have her with us today at Beyond the Books!

Thank you so for this interview, Jane.  Now that the book has been written, do you feel you were fairly portrayed or would you like to set anything straight with your readers?

It hurts to admit it, but yes—I think the novel’s portrayal of my role (including my failures) in this tough election year is accurate.  I like to think I’m a good doctor, but I do confess to weaknesses when it comes to what some people might call superstition.  But, tell me, who doesn’t have few superstitions—let’s call them

inexplicable beliefs—hiding away deep within him or herself?  I was rattled—my mother had just died, my husband was obsessed with clearing the name of his father—and here I was in the middle of a campaign trying to help my brother-in-law become the next governor.  And, Yes.  I’ll always believe it.  One morning, I saw the soul of my mother. 

Do I believe in ghosts or messages coming to us from some vaporous world?  No.  But the book is correct—I saw my mother’s soul. Only briefly, there—above her dying body.  I’ll never doubt it.  I felt her soul arise in the air, felt it hesitate, felt it come to me alone.  She knew I would believe in the sight, and so she kept fighting until her soul just couldn’t take any more.  My mother was a fighter right up until the end—even after the end.  Get it?  In the air, her soul was fighting, agitated, trying to tell me something.  You can call it crazy, but I know what I felt, what I believe.  I just wish I had known what the others were feeling.  Especially Jackson.  He is, thank goodness, the main character.  I so wanted him to succeed.  Selfish, I guess.  Now, I guess we can all see why.

Do you feel the author did a good job colorizing your personality?  If not, how would you like to have been portrayed differently?

Oh, I have sometimes wondered what it would have been like to be the main player in this story.  But that Jackson!  Such a talker, such a personality, such a hard campaigner.  And that body!  Teaches you all about the sacrifices a politician must make.  But Georgia is a tough old place, full of tough people.  It takes Jackson’s kind to win.  Despite all, I think my mother would have been proud of him.  Maybe she actually is!  There I go again—the soul thing.

What do you believe is your strongest trait?

I’m a worker.  When Jackson’s team asked me to help in his campaign, I only pretended to balk.  I was eager to work the crowds, to put my people-skills to work for the greater good.  God knows, you learn to work people in the business world.  Besides, I’m a pathologist—put me before a voter and I’ll show you where his weak parts are.  After all, medicine is an art, much like politics.  Jackson would agree with that—I’m sure of it.  Shitless Men Drink Free—it’s far more than a bar slogan.  I learned the hard way.  In politics, who doesn’t?

Worse trait?

I was selfish.  I wanted too much to please my mother—her soul—to help it find some peace in Jackson’s victory.  My husband Price was like that also, a fixer.  Only Price wanted to fix the legacy of his father.  Price calls it our Hamlet complex—Remember?  The ghost of the dead father-king telling Hamlet to “Remember me.”  Remembering too much can make you selfish, make the memory itself a king.  But that soul—I saw it.  I felt it.  I did.

If you could choose someone in the television or movie industry to play your part if your book was made into a movie, who would that be (and you can’t say yourself!)?

Oh, Sweetie.  I’ve got Meryl Streep written all over me.  But that’s a cliché, isn’t it?  My selfishness again!  Oh, I’d be pleased with any woman who can put up with all the Georgia election shenanigans.  The harder role would be Jackson’s.  He has to be a doer and a looker—and with the smarts to make a great governor.  Folks in Georgia are not that easy to please. 

Do you have a love interest in the book?

Of course, I do—I’m married to him!  But, as you know, there are a great many kinds of love, like that love you have for your parents.   Sometimes, I think that’s the strongest kind, the most moving.  Love for a parent—you just can’t break free of it.  Ask Jackson.  Remember Hamlet.  Sometimes—at least when it comes to strong-opinion people—I think Georgia’s not all that different from Denmark.

At what point of the book did you start getting nervous about the way it was going to turn out?

I don’t want to give away too much, but when that jaundiced guy showed up at the house, I knew things were going to get a whole lot more complicated.  That’s when I began to pay the penalty for my selfishness.  But I still believe it was worth it.  Her soul—I saw it.  I did. 

If you could trade places with one of the other characters in the book, which character would you really not want to be and why?

Of course, I would like to be Lily—Jackson’s campaign manager.  Lily is smart—probably the wealthiest black woman in Atlanta.  Lily always believed me, believed in me.  Lily, in a way, was a substitute for my mother, the embodiment of my mother. “Poor people,” she kept saying.  “We are such poor people.”  And she was right.  It was her soul speaking.  There I go again.

How do you feel about the ending of the book without giving too much away?

Sweetie, the soul has no ending.  This I learned from my mother.  Or maybe it was Atlanta teaching me this lesson, maybe the campaign.  Maybe it was all that time we spent in Baltimore.  Shirtless Men Drink Free is a lesson I’ll always remember.  Even though I’m a woman; in my soul, I’m a shirtless man drinking free.  Let’s just say things turned out the best for Georgia.  And, considering Jackson, even the nation. 

What words of wisdom would you give your author if he decided to write another book with you in it?

I’d tell him to not worry so much about us folks in Atlanta.  He sure as hell can’t change us.  I’d tell him to rip off his shirt, to drink free when he starts thinking about that next campaign.  Isn’t that the dream for us all?  To be out there, free.  No.  It’s not about winning.  It’s about the soul we have to set free.

Thank you for this interview, Jane.  Will we be seeing more of you in the future?

You’ll be seeing a lot more of my world in a poetry book that hopefully is arriving soon.   We’re not settled on the title yet, but it will have a lot to do with sex, greed and fried pies.   I’m from the South, see. 

RievesImage

Dwaine Rieves was born and raised in Monroe County, Mississippi.  During a career as a research pharmaceutical scientist and critical care physician, he began writing poetry and creative prose.  His poetry has won the Tupelo Press Prize for Poetry and the River Styx International Poetry Prize.  His writing has appeared in The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Georgia Review and other publications.  He can be reached at http://www.dwainerieves.com. 

ABOUT THE BOOK

In Shirtless Men Drink Free, Doctor Jane Beekman has seen her dying mother’s soul, a vision above the bed—a soul struggling with a decision, some undone task, something in this world too noble to leave.  The question that lingers—why?—prompts a shift in the doctor’s priorities.  In this election year, Jane must do what her mother, an aspiring social activist, would have done. Soon, Jane is embroiled in the world of Georgia politics, working to make sure her dynamic younger brother-in-law Jackson Beekman is selected the next governor, regardless of what the soul of the candidate’s dead father or that of his living brother—Jane’s husband—might want done. 

Indeed, it is a mother’s persistence and a father’s legacy that will ultimately turn one Beekman brother against the other, launching a struggle with moral consequences that may extend far beyond Georgia. Set amidst 2004’s polarizing election fears—immigrants and job take-overs, terrorists in waiting, homosexuals and outsider agendas—Shirtless Men Drink Free makes vivid the human soul’s struggle in a world bedeviled by desire and the fears that leave us all asking—Why? 

Engaging, beautifully written and resplendent with realism, Shirtless Men Drink Free is a standout debut destined to stay with readers long after the final page is turned.  A meticulously crafted tale that showcases an outstanding new voice in Southern fiction, Shirtless Men Drink Free has garnered high advance praise:

“This is brilliant and rare work, as attentive to an absorbing plot as it is to a poetic, chiseled cadence.”—Paul Lisicky, award-winning author of The Narrow Door: A Memoir of Friendship 

“These characters are all too real. Rieves, as Faulkner, McMurtry and Larry Brown, writes people and story that will worm, burrow into you.  Change you even.” Adam Van Winkle, Founder and Editor, Cowboy Jamboree

“Vividly sensuous, this novel is full of textures, sounds and smells.  Rieves tells a terrific story with the sensitivity of a poet.” —Margaret Meyers, author of Swimming in the Congo

Published by Tupelo Press joint venture partner Leapfolio, Shirtless Men Drink Free will be published in trade paper (ISBN: 978-1-946507-04-4, 326 pages, $16.95) and eBook editions.  The novel will be available where fine books are sold, with an arrival on January 22, 2019.

SHIRTLESS MEN DRINK FREE is also available for pre-order on Amazon or at Tupelo Press:

https://www.tupelopress.org/product/shirtless-men-drink-free/

 

%d bloggers like this: