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Literary Fiction Author Karen Glick begins blog tour January 2012

Questions in the Silence

Pump Up Your Book is pleased to announce Karen Glick’s Questions in the Silence Virtual Book Tour 2012 beginning on January 3 and ending on January 27 2012. Karen will be on hand during her worldwide tour promoting her book and giving us candid interviews and guest posts where we learn more about the author, she will have her first Twitterview and AuthorVid, both implemented by Pump Up Your Book, as well as giving her fans an opportunity to talk to her live via Pump Up Your Book’s chat room on January 27 where she will be giving away a copy of her book, Questions in the Silence! Lots of fun along the way as Karen stops off at blogs around the world to give her fans a chance to ask her questions and to find out more about this talented literary fiction author.

About Karen Glick

Karen GlickKaren Glick lives outside of Philadelphia. She is a clinical psychologist whose other interests include writing, painting, and acting. When not feverishly engaged in these pursuits, she enjoys spending time with her four children, husband, cavalier king charles spaniels and cats.

Karen has just published her first novel, Questions in the Silence.

Website | Blog | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Amazon | Amazon Kindle | Smashwords | Barnes & Noble

 

About Questions in the Silence

Questions in the SilenceAri Rothman, born with psychic abilities, has a lifelong fascination with spiritual issues. Childhood visions and intuitions combine to make her a bit of an outsider in her peer group and she turns to religion to create meaning in her life.

Ari’s childhood experiences and her strong desire to help others make her a natural psychotherapist. However, the conflict between her intuitive abilities and a more rational approach to the human psyche intensifies when her first long-term client ends his sessions unexpectedly.

Visit her official tour page at www.pumpupyourbook.com/2011/12/17/questions-in-the-silence-virtual-book-publicity-tour-january-2012/. Win copies of her book, learn more about the author and be sure to join her on January 27 2012 in the Pump Up Your Book chat room.

About Pump Up Your Book

Pump Up Your Book handles all the aspects of virtual book touring from pre-buzzing your book before the tour starts to making sure buyers will find your book long after the tour is over. If you are the author of a newly published book, have an upcoming release or just want to give a previously published book new life, a virtual book tour with Pump Up Your Book is the answer. We welcome traditionally published, electronically published and self-published authors. Our esteem list of clients include Claire Cook, Caridad Pineiro, C.W. Gortner, Barbara Bretton, Cody McFayden, James Hayman, Karen White, Kathleen Willey, Lisa Daily, Lisa Jackson, Mary Burton, Nancy Thayer, Randy Sue Coburn, Ray Comfort, Sandi Kahn Shelton, Sheila Roberts, Therese Fowler, Hope Edelman, Wendy Wax, Jon Meacham, Shobhan Bantwal, Pat Williams, Jane Green, Judge Glenda Hatchett and cook show personality Paula Deen. We also represent Random House, Abingdon Press, Zumaya Publications, WND Books, Sheaf House Publishers, New Hope Publishers, Guardian Angel Publishers, Genesis Press, and Moody Publishing. Contact us to find out what we can do for you and your book!

 

If you’d like to contact Karen for an interview or review her book, contact Dorothy Thompson at thewriterslife@gmail.com. Pump Up Your Book is an innovative public relations agency specializing in online book promotion for authors. Visit us at www.pumpupyourbook.com.

Guest Blogger: Lilian Duval gives insights on how to get published

We have a wonderful guest today.  Lilian Duval, author of You Never Know: Tales of Tobias, an Accidental Lottery Winner, is her to tell us how she got published.  Enjoy!

You Never Know is the title of my novel, just published in March, 2011, and it’s a fitting description for what I’ve been through in my publishing adventure!

Getting You Never Know published started before one word of the book was written. In 2009, I began marketing my collection of short fiction, Random Acts of Kindness, comprising seven short stories and a novella. Four of the stories had been published in magazines, so I thought I had a pretty good chance.

Using AgentQuery.com, I made a list of 217 literary agents, most of them in New York, and set about writing to them exactly as per their instructions. Some wanted query letters only; some wanted the first chapter; in my case, the first story in the collection. Some wanted to be contacted by e-mail only; others wanted postal mail only. Many of them threatened that if you dared to contact them the wrong way, your query would be deleted or recycled!

Over the course of a full year, seven of these agents requested full or partial submissions. Again, I responded exactly as they specified. Two of these very seriously considered publishing my book. They called me on the phone, they sent me frequent e-mail messages, and so on.

After a few months of this nerve-wracking attention, both of these agents declared that, in the current economic climate, a short-story collection is too difficult to sell. Would I please, therefore, write a novel and get back to them?

Okay. So I did. Fourteen months later, I had a completely finished novel, You Never Know, the engaging chronicle of a man who wins the Mega-Millions lottery halfway through the book, and then spends years adjusting to his good fortune. Early reviewers and readers from all walks of life loved it—men as well as women, as there’s a male protagonist.

What struck me was what each person said, independently: “I was immediately drawn in by the story and identified completely with Tobias (main character). I finished the book in two days and could not put it down.”

Back I went to the two very interested agents. After dragging me along for a few months, they both said something like they couldn’t get involved with the characters and didn’t feel passionate enough about the project to take it on.

Okay. So I went back to my long list of 217 agents and queried all of them. Within the next year, I had eight requests for full or partial submissions. Again, I followed all their specific guidelines for submission. Again, they dragged me along for months. Some of them still have not responded to requested material. Sigh.

One of these agents remarked, after reading the first chapter, which she requested, that I hadn’t gone into depth in characterization. Really! The first chapter is only the exposition! The next 24 chapters reveal everything. But she didn’t stay around long enough to find out.

A year after finishing the novel, I decided not to wait any longer. I’d heard from a literary publicist that Wheatmark, Inc. is better than most self-publishing companies in that the final product is truly professionally prepared, and I’ll have to agree. Wheatmark took some time to evaluate and accept my manuscript. The entire publishing process took seven months, which was longer than I’d expected, but the book is beautifully put together.

Now my major challenge is marketing, but that’s a topic for another post!

Meanwhile, my advice to authors who want to get published is: try your best to follow the traditional route through literary agents and publishers, because that will save you money on publishing and publicity. But if that fails, carefully investigate the many independent publishers out there.

Buy two books each from the companies on your final list. That’s what I did, and I’m very glad, because some of the books coming from these publishers are substandard. But the reputable firms, like Wheatmark, create books that are indistinguishable from those printed by big traditional publishing houses.

If your independent publisher provides an editor, work closely with that person on goof-proofing your manuscript. If not, carefully choose an independent editor so that the book you write says exactly what you want it to say in good, clear writing. And good luck to all!

Lilian Duval has been fascinated with lottery winners for years, and they’re the inspiration for her intriguing novel You Never Know, which explores how an ordinary man copes with terrible luck, and later, amazing luck, when he wins the Mega-Millions lottery. Her story collection, Random Acts of Kindness, will be published in 2012.

Lilian and her husband are both survivors of the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. They live in a small house in New Jersey overlooking a large county park. She’s an amateur classical guitarist and enjoys attending concerts, plays, and movies in New York City.

You can visit her website at www.lilianduval.com or follow her at Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/lilianduval and Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lilian-Duval/121776657899250?sk=wall.

 

Interview with Garasamo Maccagnone, Author of ‘Sentiments of Blue’

Garasamo Maccagnone studied writing in the 80’s at Western Michigan University and Wayne State. He is the author of the well known novel, St. John of the Midfield, the Christmas novella, For the Love of St. Nick, and the collection of stories entitled, My Dog Tim: and other stories. Maccagnone’s latest release, Sentiments of Blue, is a collection of five poems and five stories.

You can visit Garasamo online at http://garasamomaccagnone.com/. You can view a video trailer for Sentiments of Blue at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6Tgw6Ui4LQ

Q: Welcome to Beyond the Books, Garasamo. Can we start out by telling us whether you are published for the first time or are you multi-published?

I’ve written and published, The Suburban Dragon, which is a children’s book,  St. John of the Midfield, For the Love of St. Nick, My Dog Tim: and other stories, and Sentiments of Blue.

Q:  What was the name of your very first book regardless of whether it was published or not and, if not published, why?

I published The Suburban Dragon in 1994. A local publisher, who liked the story, had 10,000 copies printed. I went around to local schools and sold the book. The kids loved it.

Q: For your first published book, how many rejections did you go through before you either found a mainstream publisher, self-published it, or paid a vanity press to publish it?

In all cases, related to complete works of mine, I assumed the works would be of little interest to mainstream publishers so I sought out avenues to publish on my own. As a young writer, I had sent short stories out to various magazines and had them all returned. The process was so time consuming and costly. I decided to just work for myself.

Q:  How did the rejections make you feel and what did you do to overcome the blows?

To give you an example about publishers, I’ll use The Suburban Dragon to give you an idea of how chancy this business is. Twenty years ago, I wrote the book. Kids who read it in their classrooms, used to send me pictures of their interpretations. I have stacks of them at my house.  The book was well received by critics and sold countless copies in the Midwest. A few years back, I sent the book to a mainstream publisher to see if they had any interest in a larger distribution and they sent it back without any interest. I’m not sure they even opened my package.

Here’s a book with a twenty-year track record and no one will look at it. You just have accept it and move on.

Q:  How did it make you feel to become published for the first time and how did you celebrate?

Since The Suburban Dragon was a hit with all the kids, I was at peace with myself. I’m not sure I actually celebrated when the publisher first sent over the book though I’m sure I took my wife and kids out for dinner, since they were the inspiration for the story.

 Q:  What was the first thing you did as far as promotion when you were published for the first time?

My illustrator and I used to go to the schools and do a skit for the kids about the dragon. I would talk to the kids about not being afraid of dragons while he put on a dragon’s head and crept behind me. The kids thought it was so funny.

Q:  If you had to do it over again, would you have chosen another route to be published?

No. The course I’ve taken, allows me freedom. I’m not bound to anyone.

Q:  Have you been published since then and how have you grown as an author?

I’ve been published many times as I told you earlier. As an author, I’ve tried to diversify my portfolio to an extent, writing in different genres for the sake of curiosity, and for the sake of being challenged.

Q: Looking back since the early days when you were trying to get published, what do you think you could have done differently to speed things up? What kind of mistakes could you have avoided?

Back in the old days, only professors with a patronage published, and they were usually by small university print houses. I would have had to teach for ten years, get tenure, kiss the butt of my department head, before even getting a chance to see my work in print. Then, I would have had to read my stuff at small gatherings, libraries, coffee shops, dope dens – the beatnik circuit.  That wasn’t for me.

In the early days, I should have worked with better editors. I’ve learned that in all cases, regardless of the publisher or the marketing of the book, the most important relationship is between the writer and the editor.

Q:  What has been the biggest accomplishment you have achieved since being published?

I like when I receive correspondences from overseas about a book of mine. It’s nice to know someone from another country is enjoying your work.

Q:   If you could have chosen another profession, what would that profession be?

I’d have like to been a professional baseball player.

Q:  Would you give up being an author for that profession or have you combined the best of both worlds?

I’ve been a copy writer, broadcast engineer, business owner, CEO, coach, and teacher through this whirlwind of a life as a writer.  Though I’ve held various other jobs, I always think of myself as a writer.  I do see myself as having the best of both worlds.

Q:  How do you see yourself in ten years?

Fatter.

Interviewer’s comment: Come on.

You asked. Seriously, I’ll be doing the same as now. I like to mix in real life work as I write. It helps authenticate the characters I create. You must know them to write about them.

Q:  Any final words for writers who dream of being published one day?

Concentrate on your content. We don’t need anymore junk out there. Make sure you hire an editor that doesn’t coo in your ear. If you’re hyper-sensitive to criticism, get out now.

Literary Fiction Author Carole Waterhouse on ‘The Tapestry Baby Virtual Book Tour 2011’ in June!

The Tapestry Baby

Join Carole Waterhouse, author of the literary fiction novel, The Tapestry Baby, as she virtually tours the blogosphere June 6 – 30 2011 on her first virtual book tour with Pump Up Your Book!

About Carole Waterhouse

Carole WaterhouseA creative writing professor at California University of Pennsylvania, Carole Waterhouse is the author of two novels, The Tapestry Baby and Without Wings, and a collection of short stories, The Paradise Ranch.

Her fiction has appeared in Arnazella, Artful Dodge, Baybury Review, Ceilidh, Eureka Literary Magazine, Forum, Half Tones to Jubilee, Massachusetts Review, Minnetonka Review, Oracle: The Brewton-Parker College Review, Parting Gifts, Pointed Circle, Potpourri, Seems, Spout, The Armchair Aesthete, The Griffin, The Styles, Tucumari Literary Review, Turnrow, and X-Connect.

A previous newspaper reporter, she has published essays in an anthology, Horse Crazy: Women and the Horses They Love, and Equus Spirit Magazine. Her book reviews have appeared in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, The Pittsburgh Press, and The New York Times Book Review.

Her latest novel is The Tapestry Baby, a novel depicting a mother who believes her child is born to fulfill some special destiny and discovers her life is intertwined with six other people, raising the question of whether any of us really control our own decisions, and through the process learns that greatness can be defined in the simplest of gestures.

You can visit Carole’s website at www.Carolewaterhouse.com.

About The Tapestry Baby

Tapestry BabyKarin lives in terror that her child will be born a multi-colored version of the mysterious tattooed man she met one night. When Anna is born normal instead, she becomes convinced her daughter is meant to fulfill some special destiny that she herself can’t provide. A believer of signs and premonitions, she takes off on a journey with Vonnie, a writer friend who can’t complete any stories because the peacefulness of her own life leaves her without inspiration hoping she can make a decision along the way. The choice, however, may not fully be her own. Their lives are randomly connected with six other people. There’s Ward, a cross-dresser who chooses his lovers based on their ability to make him look good, and Daria, a photographer who wants to feel emotion with the same level of intensity she can show it in her work. Mrs. Brown is a librarian with a sordid past who masquerades in her own dowdiness and her secret admirer Ned, a music teacher experiencing a nervous breakdown who finds that his images of make-believe women are deteriorating as notes break on his piano. Pivotal are Reggie, a massive tattooed man who despite his best efforts lives in fear of destroying women the same way he once accidentally crushed a bird he held in his hand and Clarissa, a fake fortune-teller who is responsible for bringing them all together. The Tapestry Baby raises the question of whether any of us really has control over our own destinies.

Visit Carole’s official tour page at www.pumpupyourbook.com/2011/05/07/the-tapestry-baby-virtual-book-tour-2011 to see which blogs and websites he’ll be stopping off at during her The Tapestry Baby Virtual Book Tour 2011!

Why I Write Historical Fiction by M.M. Bennetts

We have a special guest today!  M.M. Bennetts, author of the historical fiction novel, Of Honest Fame (Diiarts), is here to talk about writing historical fiction! Educated at Boston University and St Andrews, M.M. Bennetts is a specialist in the economic, social and military history of Napoleonic Europe. The author is a keen cross-country and dressage rider, as well as an accomplished pianist, regularly performing music of the era as both a soloist and accompanist. Bennetts is a long-standing book critic for The Christian Science Monitor. The author is married and lives in England. You can visit the author’s website at www.mmbennetts.com.

Why I Write Historical Fiction

By M.M. Bennetts

Somewhere along the line we’ve got the idea that history itself is dry and academic, that it’s about battles, names and dates, and curiously, very few people.   But history without the people isn’t really history at all, it’s geography.

And I want to put the people back.

Recently, I read this line by journalist, Charles Moore:  “In studying history, you must imagine yourself into the truly difficult choices people had to make in the past…”

And I thought, Whoa!  That is exactly it.  Nothing can say it better.

And that is the whole job of the historical fiction writer.  For us, it is not enough to live in another person’s skin within the contemporary world, but (possibly we have a strain of masochism?) we have to complicate matters still further by adding the past senses of smells, sights and sounds that are long gone or diminishing.  Then add to that, imagining ourselves into those unequivocally awful decisions and their aftermaths.

But when we get it right, how great is the result.  How much it deepens the experience of the reader.  And how it transforms our view of our current world by understanding our birth, the nascency of the ideas with which we live, the consequences of actions long since taken.

Historical fiction is one of the greatest communicators, if you’ll pardon the hackneyed expression.

When I was studying at St. Andrews, and skiving, I frequently wandered into Innes’ Stationers and Books, climbed the stairs to the panelled haven where the book department was and sat down on the stool they had there to read.  And it was there that started reading Dorothy Dunnetts’ Lymond sequence.

And for the first time, someone was talking about the Renaissance and Europe as interconnected–artistically, economically, militarily–and doing it through a set of characters with whom I became wholly engaged.  It may have been history made easy, but it was also history made embracing.

Look at how many people were engaged by Patrick O’Brian’s novels about Captain Jack Aubrey and Dr. Stephen Maturin.  Probably more than half the bearded blokes at the conferences leading up to the bicentennial of Trafalgar in 2005 were O’Brian devotees. And that’s how many of them had come to it.  O’Brian had been their window to the past.

And the fact of the matter is I want to see our history, our past, alive and available to all.  Not just to academics in university linen-fold panelled libraries.  Not saying I don’t like faculty libraries or their reading rooms.

But I want more than anything to see people today realise that the past isn’t names and dates, it’s people–good people, bad people, all of whom loved, lived, fought, triumphed, had families, contributed, didn’t contribute, died or survived to fight another day…

And historical fiction can do that.  And do it most effectively.

It can, if skillfully written and well-researched, bridge the gap between our modern-day lives and views and theirs, however many centuries ago they lived.  It can throw open the shutters of our minds, show us their lives–their strengths, their courage, their fears, their failures–and in the process, teach us not only about the challenges of the past, but about answers for the present.

And how cool is that?

A Few Facts about the period of my novels:

1.  Napoleon was only 5’3″ or 5’4″ at most.  I’ve seen his clothes.  He had tiny feet too.

2.  The shoes of the period have neither a right nor a left–they’re like ballet shoes.  And this is true of men’s shoes as well as women’s.

3.   In Napoleon’s army, the buttons on the trousers of the French Infantry were made of tin.  Tin turns to powder in extremely cold temperatures.  So during the French army’s retreat from Moscow in autumn and winter 1812, those poor fellows couldn’t even keep their trousers up.

4.   Lord Castlereagh, the Foreign Secretary from 1812-1822, was a fine cellist.  So was the Prince Regent, later King George IV.

5.  The London fog was every bit as bad in the early years of the century as in the old Sherlock Holmes’ movies.  It was often so dense, even during the day, that you couldn’t see from one side of a square across to the other.  This was caused by the use of coal as the primary means of heating the houses.  Paris, on the other hand, was fog-free–they used wood and charcoal for heating.

6.  From November 1806, because of Napoleon’s Continental Blockade, until the end of the wars, across Europe, there was no tea, no coffee, no sugar, no chocolate and no cotton to be had.  Just like during WWII.

# # #

Of Honest Fame: Interview with M.M. Bennetts

Educated at Boston University and St Andrews, M.M. Bennetts is a specialist in the economic, social and military history of Napoleonic Europe. The author is a keen cross-country and dressage rider, as well as an accomplished pianist, regularly performing music of the era as both a soloist and accompanist. Bennetts is a long-standing book critic for The Christian Science Monitor.

The author is married and lives in England.

Bennetts’ latest book is Of Honest Fame.

You can visit the author’s website at www.mmbennetts.com.

Q: Welcome to Beyond the Books, MM.  Can we start out by telling us whether you are published for the first time or are you multi-published?

Of Honest Fame is my second novel to be published, but before that I had a long career as a free-lance book critic for The Christian Science Monitor.

Q: When you were published for the first time, which route did you go – mainstream, small press, vanity published or self-published and why or how did you choose this route?

At the time, I was desperately trying to sort out which path would be best.  I had more than one offer on the table.

One was from a well-known agency who wanted to turn my work into a series of novels, a sort of historical James Bond kind of thing, with huge commercial promise, perhaps, but they would have demanded that my first novel, May 1812, was cut nearly by a half.

On the other hand, I had this offer from a small publisher who loved my work as it was, loved the depth, research, texture and multi-layering approach to historical fiction I was taking and wanted it ‘as is’.  So, following a rather harsh edit after which a friend read it and told me I’d killed it, I restored it and went with the small press.  It was a decision which virtually made itself.

Q: How long did it take you to get published once you signed the contract?

I don’t honestly know—probably a few frantic months.  Being a small publisher, they have fewer staff to collect into meetings, so things can happen rather more quickly there.

Q: How did it make you feel to become published for the first time and how did you celebrate?

The most tremendous moment is when you hold your proof copy in your hands for the first time and gaze down on the cover—the cover that’s yours and on your book.  After that, everything is just on the edge of surreal.  And to celebrate, I reread the ending.  Just to ensure that I’d got it right.

Q: What was the first thing you did as for as promotion when you were published for the first time?

There was a big launch party in London at the London Canal Museum, and I do remember I was blogging about those rather heady days beforehand as well.

Q: Since you’ve been published, how have you grown as a writer and now a published author?

I think I’ve grown more fearless as a writer and a stylist.  I’ve had to learn to trust my use of the language, of the cadences and rhythms and the poetry of the words themselves.  I’ve also worked very hard on being more alert to the world around me—all the time—so that I’m listening as much as possible to that inner voice in terms of imagery and description.  But at the same time, I’ve grown my demanding of myself, more willing to edit ruthlessly, but also more willing to face up to the harsher vicissitudes of the period about which I write.

Q: What has surprised or amazed you about the publishing industry as a whole?

How utterly brilliant cover designers and artists are!  It’s been such a treat, such an undiluted pleasure to meet and be able to work with these ‘visionaries’ who turn our catalogues of words into these delicious, beautiful objects which call to us from across the room.

Q: What is the most rewarding thing about being a published author?

I think being an author is one of the greatest privileges because it’s such an intimate thing, a book.  Through the medium of my books, I speak directly, mind to mind—my thoughts into the minds of the reader.  There’s no one else there, no intermediary.  And that’s something truly to cherish and respect.  You can’t get better than that.

Q: Any final words for writers who dream of being published one day?

Learn to accept criticism graciously.  Courtesy is always right.  And never, ever stop learning and growing as a writer.

Interview with George Earl Parker, author of VAMPYRE BLOOD – EIGHT PINTS OF TROUBLE

George Earl Parker is an author, singer/songwriter, and an artist. As director of the short film The Yellow Submarine Sandwich, included in Eric Idle’s pseudo-documentary of a band called the Rutles, Parker received accolades, awards, and a showing at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. His art has been exhibited in museums and galleries around the country, and three of his songs have climbed the European Country Music Association charts. Vampyre Blood-Eight Pints of Trouble is his first novel. He currently lives in California where he continues working on music, and his second book.

Q: Welcome to Beyond the Books, George Earl.  Can we start out by telling us whether you are published for the first time or are you multi-published?

I’ve got to say that this is the first time I’m being published because I’m currently re-editing my first book.

Q: What was the name of your very first book regardless of whether it was published or not and, if not published, why?

It was called The Atomic Kid and it was self published for about ten minutes before the company went belly-up.

Q: For your first published book, how many rejections did you go through before you either found a mainstream publisher, self-published it, or paid a vanity press to publish it?

I was rejected by a hundreds of literary agents until I found one who believed in the book, and he said it was going to be the next big thing. But when the 15 or 20 publishers he sent it to turned it down, he became despondent. So I published it myself.

Q: How did the rejections make you feel and what did you do to overcome the blows?

I ignored them while I tried to understand what on earth I’d done to tick so many people off?

Q: When your first book was published, who published it and why did you choose them?

I can’t remember the name of the company. I just know it should have been Incompetence Incorporated. The reason I chose them however was noble, it was because they actually printed books.

Q: How did it make you feel to become published for the first time and how did you celebrate?

I was going through a re-birth at that time, and I began writing songs in earnest.

Q: What was the first thing you did as for as promotion when you were published for the first time?

The book was reviewed very well by a couple of lovely people and I tried to get those reviews out. I wrote press releases, recorded  some music, tried to make it an event, but I think I was a little to early for myself.

Q: If you had to do it over again, would you have chosen another route to be published?

No, not at all. I learned everything I know now from what I didn’t know then.

Q: Have you been published since then and how have you grown as an author?

Yes, I am happy to say that my new book, Vampyre Blood-Eight Pints of Trouble, is being published by BookLocker.com. It’s the story of a lonely monster who just wants to be normal-and like all of us, the fact that we realize it means that we must have grown.

Q: Looking back since the early days when you were trying to get published, what do you think you could have done differently to speed things up?  What kind of mistakes could you have avoided?

When you follow a path you have to adapt to the terrain. There are no shortcuts until you have mapped the territory. You must keep moving forward at all costs, and never look back.

Q: What has been the biggest accomplishment you have achieved since becoming published?

I’ve just released a new song called, Out Of The Ice, in Europe.

Q: If you could have chosen another profession, what would that profession be?

A Taoist Priest.

Q: Would you give up being an author for that profession or have you combined the best of both worlds?

You don’t give anything up in Taoism, you just learn to take more on effortlessly.

Q: How do you see yourself in ten years?

Writing and singing.

Q: Any final words for writers who dream of being published one day?

Don’t give up.

You can visit George Earl Parker on the web at www.georgeearlparker.com.

Interview with Literary Fiction Author F.W. vom Scheidt

Coming for MoneyF. W. vom Scheidt is a director of an international investment firm. He works and travels in the world’s capital markets, and makes his home in Toronto, Canada.

He is the author of Coming For Money, a fascinating and highly readable literary novel about the world of global finance … and a human quest for success, understanding and love.

More details are available at: http://www.bluebutterflybooks.ca/titles/money.html.

Q: Welcome to Beyond the Books, F. W.  Can we start out by telling us whether you are published for the first time or are you multi-published?

A: This is my first published novel.

More accurately, it is the first writing that I have wanted to publish for wide circulation.

Q: What was the name of your very first book regardless of whether it was published or not and, if not published, why?

A: I have always written.

Because I have an encompassing business career, I suppose I have not had the same opportunity to organize a novel, and I suppose I have not felt the same need to publish, as many other writers.

Q: For your first published book, how many rejections did you go through before you either found a mainstream publisher, self-published it, or paid a vanity press to publish it?

A: I suppose I did not really go down the traditional road of submission and rejection.

Upon completion, I retained a professional editor for final proofreading; the editor showed the manuscript to a publisher; and the publisher accepted it.

Q: How did the rejections make you feel and what did you do to overcome the blows?

A:  My work in all things has always flowed from a great deal of creativity.

If you are creative, you will always meet rejection.

Dealing with it requires the deep belief that rises from an examined life.

Q: When your first book was published, who published it and why did you choose them?

A: Blue Butterfly Books accepted my manuscript for publication.

As incredulous as it may seem, I would not have published with them simply because they offered me a contract.

Upon introduction, I was greatly impressed.

The company is founded on the mission statement of the publisher, Dr. Patrick Boyer, to bring to the market “interesting and important stories that are well-written for a wide audience.”

All facets of the organization are entrepreneurial, and the people have great energy and dedication.

They publish some engaging and thought provoking non-fiction, especially in politics, public policy and biography; and they are building a selective list of high quality fiction. Their books have been very well received.

The website is: www.bluebutterflybooks.ca.

Q: How did it make you feel to become published for the first time and how did you celebrate?

A: I write from personal experience; I write from what I know best.

In Coming For Money I’ve written as truthfully as possible of the world of international finance — not with the over dramatization so common in film and television, but with an intimate telling through a first-person narrative … of what it can be like to labour in the world of money spinning … of how the money’s immense leverage for triumph or disaster doesn’t so much corrupt people as corrupt the way they treat each other … of how the relentless demands of the money so often deprive you of sufficient time and energy to live through the events of your emotional and interior life.

Yet I have tried to tell this story in a way that will let others in our increasingly isolated society know that they are not alone. I have also tried to say something about the value of not surrendering to the seduction of victimizing others as a defence against being victimized. In writing a narrative about not giving up, I attempted to capture something true and evocative about how all journeys toward the light begin in darkness. And I have offered readers some assurance that, of such journeys, they can become restored to wholeness.

So there was a certain satisfaction in knowing that work would reach others.

I celebrated by giving the first copy to someone special.

Q: What was the first thing you did as for as promotion when you were published for the first time?

A: I retained Pump Up Your Promotion.

Q: If you had to do it over again, would you have chosen another route to be published?

A: No.

Q: Have you been published since then and how have you grown as an author?

A: I have not been published since; I am working on my next book.

I’m not sure how I would define growing as an author … but, as a human being, I try to grow in small way every day.

Q: Looking back since the early days when you were trying to get published, what do you think you could have done differently to speed things up?  What kind of mistakes could you have avoided?

A: I would not have changed anything.

Q: If you could have chosen another profession, what would that profession be?

A: I have chosen another profession.

Q: Would you give up being an author for that profession or have you combined the best of both worlds?

A:  I have combined the best of both worlds.

Q: How do you see yourself in ten years?

A: Never slowing down.

Q: Any final words for writers who dream of being published one day?

A: Write.

An Interview with Literary Fiction Author Candis C. Coffee

Candis C. Coffee grew up in West Texas where her family has lived since 1848 when they immigrated from Ireland. The house in Mariposa is based on the 150-year-old home of her grandparents on the banks of the Concho River in San Angelo.

Candis spent nearly fifteen years in Santa Monica, California, where she was employed as a writer for various organizations. She later moved to New Orleans where she helped Chef Paul Prudhomme write the cookbook of his dreams and titled it Fork in the Road. Candis longed for the desert, however, which inspired a move to Santa Fe and graduate school at the University of New Mexico. She has since returned to her birthplace in West Texas where she currently resides.

After receiving a BA in Literature from the University of Texas, she pursued graduate studies in Creative Writing, Literature, and Spanish. She is presently at work on a children’s book and is pursuing a doctoral degree in alternative health care and the healing arts.

You can visit her website at www.candiscoffee.com.

Welcome to Beyond the Books, Candis. Can you tell us whether you are published for the first time or multi-published? Can you give us the title(s) of your book(s)?

I co-authored a book with cartoonist, Rick Detorie (One Big Happy), titled ILLUSTRATED SEXUAL TRIVIA, in the mid-eighties. The book sold a lot of copies. Rick had written a number of cartoon books by this point and was about to become famous.

What was the name of your very first book regardless of whether it was published or not and, if not published, why?

My own very first book was MARIPOSA.

For your first published book, how many rejections did you go through before you either found a mainstream publisher, self-published it, or paid a vanity press to publish it?

I spent two years each, with three huge NY agents, such as Writer’s House and McIntosh & Otis, being groomed for publication. Representation was assured, if I would just tweak the book a bit, here and there. This is not a good idea, to agree to work with agents under these conditions, for I’ve come to believe that they will not ever be satisfied. In fact, I read an article about this phenomenon in Writer’s Digest decades ago. The author advised writers to avoid doing re-writes for publishers or agents unless a deal was on the table, for there is a psychological force that comes into play, and the publisher/agent will not or cannot reach that needed point of satisfaction. There is always just one more spot that needs work. None of the agents actually ended up representing me, though they’d expressed great enthusiasm for my book at first. I spent most of my time with agents and then was finally accepted, without the help of an agent, by a new, small traditional publisher in California, one that I accidentally stumbled on.

How did the rejections make you feel and what did you do to overcome the blows?

I would be completely devastated for 24 hours. Just finished with writing, crying to friends, full of pronouncements of my next step…to become a stockbroker, jump into the Mississippi River, etc. Then, after a day of misery, I’d be right back into the game, ready to send out new queries.

When your first book was published, who published it and why did you choose them?

MARIPOSA was published by Behler Publications of California. I chose them because they loved my book and so many years had passed by this point. I had recently lost a beloved friend and was grieving. I just wanted to have my book become alive in the world, as it was in my heart.

How did it make you feel to become published for the first time and how did you celebrate?

I felt a mix of excitement and distrust. I wondered if Behler would come through for me. An established publisher in South Carolina had long pondered whether or not to publish MARIPOSA, and I wondered if I’d made a mistake, not giving him a bit more time. I celebrated quietly because I was still in mourning. It just felt finally right at least my book would be in the world after so many years of rewrites and rejection.

What was the first thing you did as for as promotion when you were published for the first time?

I set up book-signings in my region. A friend contacted the local paper and an interview was arranged. I was nominated for a local contest for best writer in the area.

If you had to do it over again, would you have chosen another route to be published?

No, I don’t know of another route, except that after one re-write, if an agent or publisher does not offer a contract, I would find the courage to walk away from them, even if they are the big guys.

Have you been published since then and how have you grown as an author?

I have not yet been published again. I don’t know that I have grown as a writer, but I have changed. I no longer see writing novels as a career choice. I, like Mickey Spillane, used to see readers as customers. I wrote MARIPOSA to be read. I have writer friends who write first for themselves, and if the book sells, all the better. That had not been my attitude. Now it is.

Looking back since the early days when you were trying to get published, what do you think you could have done differently to speed things up? What kind of mistakes could you have avoided?

I don’t think I could have speeded things up. I sent multiple queries often. The one mistake I might have made is to not have immediately started on another serious writing project, while sending MARIPOSA out. The only problem is that I didn’t have a serious writing idea.

What has been the biggest accomplishment you have achieved since becoming published?

I was Writer of the Month for the West Texas/Dallas District of Barnes & Noble. I have heard some lovely words about my book.

If you could have chosen another profession, what would that profession be?

I would have become a veterinarian or wildlife biologist. Or a professor of Romance Languages.

Would you give up being an author for that profession or have you combined the best of both worlds?

I am interested in animal communication though I would want to write about that rather than counsel people about their pets.

How do you see yourself in ten years?

My wish is to study animals and learn to genuinely communicate with them. I know that it can be done because I have had very real, though sporadic dialogues with them, in terms of mental words or pictures. I am interested in their true intelligence. I’d like to travel the world and write about both domestic and wild animals, fiction and non-fiction.

Any final words for writers who dream of being published one day?

Writing is perhaps 15% of the process. The other 85% is being fabulous, so that people fall in love with you and then want to buy your book. This is true for most writers, though not all. A few writers, the really good ones as far as current culture is concerned, can still be true to themselves. They can be weird, unattractive, unfriendly, and it doesn’t matter because someone somewhere discovered their work and told others about it. That is my dream. Not to be weird, unattractive and unfriendly necessarily, but to have that option if I wish.

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